World refugee day: Teen refugees’ art put on display


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British Red Cross

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The Not Welcome stencil was created by an Eritrean refugee, now 18, who fled military conscription when he was 16. The teenager, who now lives in Gravesend, wanted to show how refugees and asylum seekers can be greeted by negative press

A patchwork lifejacket and a welcome mat bearing the message “not welcome” are among the artworks created by young refugees and asylum seekers on display at a new exhibition.

All I left behind. All I will discover, is being held at London’s Oxo Tower as part of Refugee Week.

More than 80 teens aged 15 to 19 from countries including Syria, Eritrea and Sudan have contributed to the project.

They all separated from their families and now live in London or Kent.

Each artist’s work is inspired by their memories of home, journey to the UK and hopes for the future.

The British Red Cross, which is supporting the young artists, said many of them came to Europe during the height of the 2015 refugee crisis.

Others made their way across the Sahara and were detained in Libya before crossing the Mediterranean on their way to the UK.

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British Red Cross

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About 30 different patches were sewn onto a life vest for Life Jacket, made by a group of young people. One of those patches reads: “Hello My Name is Home Office Reference Number AB123456789”, with another saying: “I want equality”

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British Red Cross

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One Country. One World. One Planet. One Future. is a work that plays on the themes of board game snakes and ladders and shows the routes taken by refugees on their way to the UK

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British Red Cross

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A teenage girl has drawn her experience of crossing the Mediterranean Sea in Journey by Boat – she says she can name every single person in her picture

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British Red Cross

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Hallo Frieden has the word peace written on it in several languages, including English, Arabic and Tigrinya – the main language spoken in Eritrea. The print is inspired by the kanga, a textile worn in East Africa that has words and phrases written on it

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British Red Cross

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Four refugees from Eritrea were inspired by ceramic artist Grayson Perry to create Home, which shows memories of their previous lives including this market stall selling fruit and vegetables.

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British Red Cross

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Inshallah is based on a teenager’s journey through the Libyan desert in an overcrowded pick-up truck. When a young boy fell out, the driver was asked to stop but responded “Inshallah”, meaning “if God wills it” – and kept driving.

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British Red Cross

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This work, Peace, was made by a group of refugees based in London who wanted to show their hope for a world full of peace and love

The exhibition is held at [email protected] at the Oxo Tower from 21-25 June.

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Source : http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-40339746

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